The Best Things To Watch On Netflix Right Now

Salt Fat Acid Heat

Salt Fat Acid Heat
Image Source: Netflix

Food shows are abundant on the streaming service, just like any other broadcaster. But the deliciously sweet demeanor of presenter and writer Samin Nosrat makes Salt Fat Acid Heat one of the more interesting morsels served up by Netflix. In the four episodes, spanning four different countries — Japan, Italy, Mexico, California in the U.S. — and four essential elements to cooking — salt, fat, acid, heat — scenes in which each audible slurp and swallow illustrate the full, rich pleasure the chef/author finds in eating good food.

Hasan Minhaj, Homecoming King

Hasan Minhaj, Homecoming King
Image Source: Jim Spellman/Getty Images

The Daily Show’s Hasan Minhaj uses his Netflix stand-up special, Homecoming King, to weave an intricate and hilarious account of his life as a son of Indian-American immigrants. The special was adapted from Minhaj’s 2015 Off Broadway play of the same name, and its narrative style is more akin to an episode of “The Moth” podcast than to a typical stand-up show. But what really makes this special stand out is how Minhaj manages to be bluntly honest about the difficulties of being brown in America without ranting about Muslim bans, Trump’s presidency, and other obvious issues that have been touched on before.

Mindhunter

Mindhunter
Image Source: Netflix

David Fincher’s gloomy serial killer drama didn’t quite get the people talking when it first arrived, but its slow-building intrigue gripped enough people for Netflix to renew it for a second season. The grim crime drama aims to understand the inner workings of notorious criminals. The series follows soft-spoken FBI agent Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff) and his gruff partner, Bill Tench (Holt McCallany), as they tour the USA interviewing the nation’s most heinous serial killers.

Maniac

Maniac
Image Source: Netflix

Bizarre, trippy, but brilliant. Based on a Norwegian TV series of the same name, Maniac stars Jonah Hill as Owen Milgrim, a despondent paranoid schizophrenic and Emma Stone as Annie Landbergh, a drug addict who is haunted by the death of her beloved sister. The 10-part mini-series is a mix of ’90s nostalgia populated by crummy little robots, antiquated 8-bit displays, and vintage style.

Queer Eye

Queer Eye
Image Source: Netflix

An all new Fab Five and a feel-good heart that most broadcasters could only dream of, Netflix struck gold with its reboot of Queer Eye. The new “Fab Five”—Jonathan Van Ness, Bobby Berk, Tan France, Karamo Brown, and Antoni Porowski—now use their considerable skills to polish diamonds in the rough across the sexuality spectrum, not just straight ones. The series has already found a loyal fan base, and season two is just as joyous as the first.

The Staircase

The Staircase
Image Source: Netflix

In 2001, Kathleen Peterson was found dead at the bottom of the stairs in the North Carolina home she shared with her husband, the novelist Michael Peterson. Shortly after, Peterson was charged with first-degree murder. The original true crime documentary, The Staircase is the remarkable story of the trial of Peterson and the result of filmmaker Jean-Xavier de Lestrade’s vision for a new style of crime reporting.

Ugly Delicious

Ugly Delicious
Image Source: Netflix

David Chang, the Korean-American rebel chef and ruler of the Momofuku empire, is a foodie with little patience for the pretentiousness that often come with that title. Netflix’s Ugly Delicious is defined by that attitude. Chang and team do a fantastic job of not just celebrating each food item in its several distinct forms, but also capture the underlying warmth and passion that creates such good food to begin with.

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Image Source: Netflix

Over the course of four seasons, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt has created its own weird little world, one where Greg Kinnear does daytime improv and the cats of Cats can’t be trusted. Much of the show’s unique charm can be traced to its core cast, anchored by Ellie Kemper, who make up one of TV’s most eclectic yet well-defined ensembles. The final episodes of Unbreakable capture all the undeniable charm of Kimmy, delivering some series-best moments and great new and returning guest stars.

The Haunting of Hill House

The Haunting of Hill House
Image Source: Netflix

Mike Flanagan’s The Haunting of Hill House is a character-driven story, delving into the psychological problems of its many protagonists. One dark and ominous night, Hugh Crain (Henry Thomas) gathers his children and flees their vast, gothic mansion, leaving his wife, Olivia (Carla Gugino), behind. Olivia dies that night, her death ruled a suicide, and the tabloids run wild with stories of the haunted Hill House.

Narcos: Mexico

Narcos: Mexico
Image Source: Netflix

Netflix’s drug-war drama moves the action to Mexico and resets its cat-and-mouse game with Diego Luna and Michael Peña as leads. However, the show does well to maintain its structure and intensity. Narcos: Mexico profiles Guadalajara kingpin Félix Gallardo, who made millions by uniting disparate regional marijuana dealers in a price-fixing gang, then couldn’t resist gambling on diversifying into coke. At its best, Narcos: Mexico is reminiscent of HBO’s seminal series The Wire, exploring both the criminal enterprises and law enforcement, delving into its best and worst characters through compelling performances.

Chef’s Table

Chef’s Table
Image Source: Netflix

If you’re new to the Chef’s Table phenomenon, or if you abandoned the series after getting fed up with all the temperamental geniuses on display, Season 5 is a great place to dive in. The documentary series has always wandered all over the globe, but this new season is the most diverse in terms of gender and class. Two of the four featured chefs are women, and two of the chefs own restaurants that are relatively inexpensive and accessible. The show’s cast and the filmmakers are all working at the top of their game.

You

You
Image Source: Netflix

Netflix series You stars Penn Badgley as a figure who goes beyond antiheroism—he’s a murderous stalker whose obsession with a young woman he meets briefly turns into the governing force in both of their lives. Badgley plays Joe, a bookstore manager and absolute creepazoid who spots a woman shopping in his store — Beck, played by Elizabeth Lail — and immediately decides she must be his. With Lifetime’s You — inspired by Caroline Kepnes’ 2014 book of the same name — Joe takes the New York City rom-com conceits we’ve come to love and corrupts them with strains of obsession, cyber stalking, and violence.

Black Mirror

Black Mirror
Image Source: Netflix

Black Mirror: Bandersnatch is another installment of Black Mirror that raises questions about technology, free will, and the impact of innovation on mental health. It’s also an installment of Black Mirror unlike anything else in the series, or on most of Netflix, for that matter, because it’s interactive and allows viewers to select narrative options that guide the story along numerous paths. With its many facets, endings, story arcs, and extensive hype about its game-changer status, Black Mirror: Bandersnatch is, in summary, fantastic.

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette

Hannah Gadsby: Nanette
Image Source: Netflix

The first half of Nanette falls more within the boundaries of a traditional special, with jokes about identity and growing up “a little bit lesbian” in conservative Tasmania. But midway through, Hannah Gadsby starts methodically dissecting how comedy works to explain why she needs to quit stand-up altogether. In her first Netflix hour, released last month, Australian Gadsby delivers both sharp setups and punchlines, and a searing indictment of comedy itself.

Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes

Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes
Image Source: Netflix

Ted Bundy, who was executed 30 years ago after confessing to the murders of 30 women, loved attention, but didn’t want to be caught and punished for his crimes — a common conundrum among serial killers. Bundy was one of the most prolific, and, if the new Netflix documentary series Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes is to be believed, one of the slipperiest, hiding in plain sight as the bodies piled up. If you’re interested in true crime, and serial killers in particular, you might already know all this. The series premiered on Netflix on January 24th of this year.

Tidying Up With Marie Kondo

Tidying Up With Marie Kondo
Image Source: Netflix

Kondo, the Japanese organization consultant who has transformed decluttering into something of a religion with her book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, is now converting hapless Americans to her minimalist lifestyle in front of a camera. Tidying Up With Marie Kondo, a seemingly inevitable Netflix series inspired by the Kondo brand, follows the Japanese clutter purger into various homes as she guides mess makers through the process of curbing their excess crap and creating more manageable lives. The series premiered January 1st of this year.

To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before

To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before
Image Source: Netflix

Netflix got in on the teen romance genre in 2018, to great success. Their breakout smash of the year was the YA romance adaptation To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before. Based on the bestselling book of the same name, To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before centers on teenager Lara Jean (Lana Condor) as she deals with the fallout of the release of her secret love letters to all of her past and present crushes. To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before is reminiscent of classic romantic comedies and will undoubtedly appeal to your inner teen.

Grace and Frankie

Grace and Frankie
Image Source: Netflix

While the Netflix comedy has never shied away from heavy subject matter, Marta Kauffman and Howard J. Morris’ latest season of Grace and Frankie finds motivation in a growing sense of an encroaching end — not for the show, which has already been renewed for Season 6, but for the characters. Things are going pretty well, all things considered, for the four leads, and they’re panicking while trying to preserve their newfound happiness. Season 5 begins where season 4 left off, and the two women (Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin) decide that they are calling the shots in their lives again.

Abducted in Plain Sight

Abducted in Plain Sight
Image Source: Netflix

Robert Berchtold, a husband and father, was an affable, charming man. Everybody in the Broberg family adored him, and the children saw him as a second father. But Berchtold, then 40, had an agenda: He was sexually fixated on 12-year-old Jan Broberg. The Netflix film features interviews with Broberg family members and an FBI agent who worked the case, interspersed with re-enactments of what happened. “The film documents a tragedy so incomprehensible, audiences don’t know how to react,” according to VICE.

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
Image Source: Netflix

Character-rich, strikingly photographed, with occasional humor and deft moments of poignancy, the uniquely talented Coen Brothers add another gem to their long list of treasures with their Netflix film, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs. It’s an anthology of six short films that take place in 19th-century post-Civil War era during the settling of the Old West. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs swerves from goofy to ghastly so deftly and so often that you can’t always tell which is which.

Bird Box

Bird Box
Image Source: Netflix

The latest addition to Netflix’s collection of original movies, Bird Box is an adaptation of the 2014 horror-thriller novel of the same name by Josh Malerman. Starring Sandra Bullock, the film depicts unseen creatures as supernatural, in one way or another, with an ability to drive insane anyone who sets eyes upon them. Between its director Susanne Bier and incredible cast, the film is pretty stacked with talent and makes for a worthwhile genre movie.

Fyre Festival: The Greatest Party That Never Happened

Fyre Festival: The Greatest Party That Never Happened
Image Source: Netflix

The Netflix Fyre Festival documentary is one of those films that gives you loads of information yet you still immediately want to Google absolutely everything there is to know about the subject. Fyre was a highly publicized, seemingly luxury music festival in the Bahamas which was supposed to take place in April 2017. In reality, it turned out to be a few Hurricane relief tents and no live music. The Netflix documentary (which was co-produced by Jerry Media) looks at what went wrong, how it became such an infamous disaster, and what the after effects of Fyre continue to be.

Bodyguard

Bodyguard
Image Source: Netflix

The six-part political thriller tells the story of Principal Protection Officer David Budd (Richard Madden), who is assigned to protect controversial British home secretary Julia Montague (Keeley Hawes). The very first episode throws viewers into a nail-biting stand-off featuring former military man, Budd, and a potential suicide bomber. The show aired weekly on BBC1 in the UK, but is now available to binge on Netflix in the USA and internationally.

Roma

Roma
Image Source: Netflix

For the first time in history, a Netflix original movie has tied for the most Oscar nominations in this year’s 91st annual Academy Awards. In Roma, the Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón uses a large canvas to tell the story of lives that some might think are small. A personal epic set in Mexico City in the early 1970s, it centers on a young indigenous woman who works as a maid for a middle-class white family that’s falling apart. Though you can see Roma in a limited number of movie theaters, the R-rated film is streaming now on Netflix.

Velvet Buzzsaw

Velvet Buzzsaw
Image Source: Netflix

Art is dangerous and those who profit from it are risking their lives in Dan Gilroy’s bloody satire Velvet Buzzsaw. The Netflix film follows the terrors inflicted on the likes of critic Morf Vandewalt (Jake Gyllenhaal) and dealer Rhodora Haze (Rene Russo) — who both worked on his 2014 movie, Nightcrawler — when they start to posthumously promote the disturbing work of “outsider artist” Ventril Dease after he is found dead one day. The film was released on February 1, 2019, by Netflix and in selected theaters.